Jamia Mosque, City Hall declared monuments

Three structures, including Hong Kong’s oldest mosque, were on Friday declared monuments by the government.

Jamia Mosque, on Shelley Street in Central, was built around 1915, with features such as the minaret crowned by a dome decorated with finial, as well as pointed multifoil archways at the entrance portico and doorways.

“Jamia Mosque is historically significant as it has witnessed the growth of the Muslim community in Hong Kong,” a government statement says. “It remains as an important place of worship and gathering for local Muslims.”

The City Hall and Lui Seng Chun in Mong Kok were also declared monuments.

The City Hall at Edinburgh Place, which was opened in 1962, was the first multi-purpose cultural complex open to the people of Hong Kong.

Lui Seng Chun is a four-storey tong lau, or Chinese-style building, which was built in 1931 by Lui Leung, one of the founders of KMB. The family donated the building to the government in 2003 for preservation, and it has since been revitalised as a Chinese medicine and healthcare centre.