‘More than 160 graves found near ex-indigenous school’ in Canada

People lay flowers, candles, and shoes at an impromptu vigil as part of the "No Pride in Genocide" event in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, July 1, 2021, to encourage reflection on Canada's treatment of indigenous people following the discovery of unmarked graves at residential schools in the country. (COLE BURSTON / AFP)

OTTAWA – More than 160 unmarked graves have been found near a former indigenous residential school in Canada's British Columbia province, according to a Canadian television network.

The Penelakut Tribe found the "undocumented and unmarked" graves around the Kuper Island Industrial School operated from 1890 until 1975 on the Penelakut Island, formerly known as the Kuper Island, where many horrors have already been documented, CTV reported on Monday night without specifying how the graves were found.

It is the fourth discovery of unmarked graves near indigenous residential schools in the country

It is the fourth discovery of unmarked graves near indigenous residential schools in the country.

ALSO READ: More unmarked graves found near former school in Canada

On June 30, the indigenous community Aq'am announced the discovery of the remains of 182 people in unmarked graves around a former indigenous residential school near the town of Cranbrook in British Columbia.

On June 24, the Cowessess First Nation, an indigenous group in Saskatchewan province, announced a preliminary discovery of 751 unmarked graves near a former indigenous residential school

On May 28, the remains of 215 indigenous children were discovered in unmarked graves near the Kamloops Indian Residential School, also in British Columbia.

Survivors of Canada's indigenous residential schools said the findings were just the tip of the iceberg, renewing their feelings of grief and trauma.

READ MORE: Canada urged to reveal truth over abuses of indigenous people

An estimated 150,000 indigenous children across Canada were reportedly removed from their homes and forced to attend residential schools between the 1890s and as recently as 1996.